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It seems a while since I updated this page, an indication of the demands of a busy life, however it is already mid-summer and a two week break, at the end of May/June, in our beloved part of West Penwith, near Morvah, presented the opportunity to make over 60 drawings. Mostly up on the moor at Chun Down, focusing on the tracks and paths leading to and from the prehistoric sites of Chun Castle and Chun Quoit, all surrounded  by a natural wild garden, predominantly gorse, young bracken and heather, not quite in bloom when we were there.

   

My interest in paths, tracks and journeys or pilgrimages was inspired by revisiting one of Wendell Berry’s essays – ‘On a Native Hill’ and my involvement in The Mending Project (2013/14, see below) and the rituals that we all take and make throughout our lives, marking moments of transition and change  -  ’rights of passage’. Some are directly connected to our birth right and mark the unpreventable, like birth and death and the ageing process between, while others, might be called, destiny and are of our own choosing  -  marriage, significant birthdays or career changes. Other’s can be thrust upon us, like the unpredictable death of a loved one. All are tied in to life’s journey and marked by some form of ritual.

Making each of my sculptures incorporates a process of doubt and discovery or trial and response, teasing out ‘material’ from the subconscious. It is a place of liminal experience, a threshold of change, where uncertainty and mixed emotions trigger new activity. Chun Quoit and the other Cornish Quoits mark places of burial from the megalithic period, believed to have been built 2500 years BC (Two millennia before the iron age hill fort of Chun Castle, 400 yards away). Today, Chun Quoit marks a crossing or meeting of five multi directional paths. My imagination plays with the notion that these paths have been used for as long as the Quoit has been there, it is a place where you can meet a diverse range of people, because the mysterious attraction is universal, therefore the tracks mark a kind of transition for all who walk them, depending on the nature of their visit. You will never be quite the same after pondering those giant stones. A cap stone weighing 20 tons or more and how it possibly could have been manoeuvred into place by a gang of young men wearing garments made from animal skins and rudimentary tools and weapons for killing the same.
 

May 2017

 


‘FIGURES & FORMS’ 
 The Marlow Gallery
Melbourne
Derbyshire
DE73 8JH

 

New wire work amongst colour and wood pieces showing in this exhibition